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Because over 85 percent of senior dogs and cats have serious dental problems, including gingivitis and periodontal disease. If left untreated, these diseases can affect the heart, liver and kidneys.

Imagine what your teeth would be like if you didn’t brush them for a year. Talk about bad breath! And disease! Now consider that your pet can’t brush her own teeth. And MAYBE you take her to the vet for a dental cleaning once a year.

Periodontal disease is a progressive and painful infection of the tissue surrounding the teeth. It starts out as a bacterial film called plaque. When the bacteria die, they can be calcified by calcium in saliva. This forms a hard, rough substance called tartar or calculus, which allows more plaque to accumulate.

Prevention is the Key

The best preventive step for ALL pets is the same as it is for you: brush daily, and get regular dental exams.  When brushing their teeth (you DO brush their teeth, don’t you?) always check for red or swollen gums and excessive bad breath.  It’s generally recommended that you have your pet’s teeth checked once or twice a year, depending on her age, breed, diet and lifestyle.  And in the long run – as well as in your pet’s mouth – something really is better than nothing.

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