cool dog

They sleep in cool shade. They play in cool dirt. They lay in cool shadows. They don’t have to work.

It seems dogs and cats are pretty cool about keeping cool.

Why?  They don’t wear pants – and they don’t sweat.  Of course, we all know that they do, indeed, pant.  They pant to help dispel heat.

However, when it’s very hot, panting is not an efficient method of cooling off.  In most cases, rest and a cool drink of water is all your pet needs to recover from the heat.  But when it’s very hot, the heat can pose serious risks to your pet.

Follow these tips to help your pet beat the heat during the dog days of summer.

NEVER LEAVE A PET ALONE IN A PARKED CAR!!

On a hot day, your car can become a furnace in no time. The temperature inside can reach 120 Degrees in minutes, EVEN with the windows slightly open, resulting in heatstroke, which occurs when a dog’s or cat’s temperature rises above 104 degrees.  Please don’t leave a pet alone in a parked car.

Since dogs and cats do not perspire to cool their bodies like people do, they can’t tolerate exposure to hot temperatures.   Heat exhaustion can occur in only a few minutes if proper care is not taken.

HEATSTROKE SYMPTOMS:

• Difficulty Breathing

• Profuse Salivation

• Very Rapid Pulse

• Vomiting / Diarrhea

• Glazed Eyes

• Seizures/ Weakness / Distress

• Lack of Coordination

 

If you suspect that your pet is suffering from heat exhaustion, call or get to the vet immediately.

In the meantime, move him to a cooler location, douse with cool (NOT COLD) water or wrap his neck head and chest in cool, damp towels.  Encourage him to drink or lick ice cubes, but don’t force it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>